55 Coins Worth Money: The World’s Most Valuable Coins

Want to know what coins are worth the most money? You’ll LOVE this guide of the world’s most sought after coins.

Key Stat: According to a recent study, the coin collection market was valued at $8.8 billion in 2022 and is expected to grow to $20.9 billion by 2031, at a CAGR of 10.5% during the forecast period 2023-2031.

I’ve put together 45 of the world’s most valuable coins. Updated for 2024, I’ve done my best to document the biggest movers and shakers in our industry.

And you can jump to any category to find exactly what you’re looking for. 

Let’s get cracking.

Table of Contents

Coins Worth Millions – the 10 Most Valuable Coins

Let’s get straight to the point. Here are the big hitters from around the world:

CoinCountryOriginal valueCurrent Value
1933 Double EagleUSA$20$18.9 million
1794 Flowing Hair DollarUSA$1$12 million
1787 Brasher DoubloonUSA$20$10-12 million
1861 Paquet Liberty Head double eagleUSA$20$7.2 million
1903 Fengtien TaelChina$20$6.9 million
1913 Liberty Head NickelUSA$0.05$5 million
Umayyad Gold Dinar(Umayyad Caliphate)$4$5 million
1723 Portuguese 400 Reis (Olhos de Boi)Portugal$26$2.7 million
1797 Gold GuineaGreat Britain$1$2.5 million
1804 Draped Bust DollarUSA$1$2-3 million

Heritage Auction’s Biggest Coin Sales of 2023

And here’s what the market looked like in 2023.

The biggest coin sales in 2023, according to Heritage Auctions, were:

CoinDescriptionSold forDate
1870-S Three Dollar Gold, SP50The 1870-S three dollar gold piece is an unparalleled numismatic rarity, with only one confirmed example and possibly another encased in the San Francisco Mint’s cornerstone, surpassing the rarity of the 1804 dollar and 1913 Liberty nickel and likened to the Mona Lisa for its uniqueness and value, amidst the enigmatic coinage of the 1870 San Francisco Mint.$5,520,000.00Jan 5, 2023
1907 Ultra High Relief Double EagleThe 1907 $20 Ultra High Relief double eagle, graded PR69 by PCGS and featuring inverted edge lettering, is a rare and artistically acclaimed masterpiece in U.S. coinage, designed by Augustus Saint-Gaudens under the patronage of President Theodore Roosevelt. Among only 20 known specimens, with this PR69 from the Harry Bass Core Collection marking its third auction appearance, it embodies the pinnacle of numismatic beauty and rarity.$4,320,000.00Aug 10, 2023
1829 Capped Head Left Half EagleThe 1829 Small Date Capped Head Left half eagle proof, graded PR66+ Cameo by PCGS and part of the Harry Bass Core Collection, is an extraordinary rarity from an era marked by significant advancements in minting technology. As one of only two known proofs, with the other in the Smithsonian, this coin represents a pivotal design change and technological innovation in early 19th-century U.S. coinage, highlighted by the introduction of the close collar. This piece stands out for its historical significance and rarity.$3,840,000.00Aug 10, 2023
1873-CC No Arrows Seated DimeThe 1873-CC No Arrows dime, graded MS65 by PCGS and part of the Eliasberg-Battle Born Collections, is the only known example of its kind, making it uniquely significant among U.S. coins. After the Coinage Act of 1873 mandated the melting of such coins, this dime emerged as a singular survivor, essential for collectors seeking to complete comprehensive U.S. or Carson City mint coin sets, a feat achieved by only two collectors to date.$3,600,000.00Jan 12, 2023
1870-S Seated Liberty Half DimeThe unveiling of the 1870-S half dime at the 1978 ANA Convention marked a significant discovery in numismatics, being previously unrecognized for 108 years. This MS64 PCGS-graded coin, confirmed genuine through rigorous examination including scanning electron microscopy, became a celebrated rarity. Its journey from an unrecorded item to a numismatic marvel highlights its unique place in U.S. coinage history and showcases the collaborative efforts in its authentication.$3,120,000.00Jan 11, 2023
1829 Capped Head Left Half EagleThe 1829 Large Diameter Capped Bust Left half eagle, graded PR66+ by PCGS from the Harry Bass Jr. Collection, is a pinnacle of early U.S. coinage, known for its rarity with only a few specimens existing. This coin, notable for its exceptional condition and historical significance, marks a transitional period in minting technology, showcasing the last of its kind before advancements like the close collar and heavy screw press revolutionized coin production for enhanced detail and uniformity.$2,880,000.00May 7, 2023
1855-S Three Dollar GoldThe 1855-S $3 gold piece, unique as a PR64 Cameo proof and authenticated by CAC, represents one of the rarest and most enigmatic U.S. coins, minted to celebrate the inaugural three dollar denomination at the San Francisco Mint. Its mysterious provenance, safeguarded by a California family for over a century, contributes to its allure. Heritage Auctions showcases this unparalleled numismatic gem, embodying exceptional rarity and historical significance.$2,160,000.00Feb 9, 2023
1795 Capped Bust Right EagleThe 1795 Capped Bust Right eagle, featuring a 9 Leaves reverse, stands as a notable rarity in early U.S. gold coinage, hailed as the most desirable among its type. With an estimated 18-22 specimens existing across all grades, this MS64 PCGS-graded coin, part of the Harry W. Bass, Jr. Collection, represents the pinnacle of the Small Eagle die varieties. Heritage Auctions proudly offers this finest-known example, marking its inaugural confirmed auction appearance.$2,100,000.00Jan 5, 2023
1798 Capped Bust Right Half EagleThe 1798 Capped Bust Right half eagle, featuring the old Small Eagle reverse and graded AU53 by PCGS, is a significant rarity with just six or seven examples known, making it one of the rarest in its series. With two specimens housed in the Smithsonian Institution and no Mint State pieces existing, this coin is among the finest of its kind. This offering by Heritage Auctions represents a rare opportunity to acquire such a sought-after early gold piece in only its second auction appearance.$1,980,000.00Aug 10, 2023
1796 16 Stars Half Dollar, Resplendent MS66The 1796 50C with 16 Stars, O-102, T-2, graded MS66 by PCGS and part of the high rarity category (High R.5), exemplifies the Philadelphia Mint’s early efforts in coin design transition. Featured in the O’Neal Collection and representing the shift from Flowing Hair to Draped Bust, this coin captures the Mint’s endeavor to craft imagery fitting for a burgeoning nation amidst debates over its design origins, attributed to figures like Gilbert Stuart and Robert Scot.$1,800,000.00Jan 12, 2023

Most Valuable US Coins

Let’s talk about rare American coins. Here are some of the most valuable US coins worth money:

1933 Double Eagle

The 1933 double eagle is a gold coin of the United States with a denomination of 20 dollars. Though 445,500 pieces of this Saint-Gaudens double eagle were produced in 1933, they never entered official circulation and all except two were instructed to be melted. Yet, 20 more escaped the melt via theft, eventually landing in collectors’ hands before being reclaimed. Eight of these retrieved coins were subsequently destroyed, leaving only 14 of these exceptionally rare coins in existence today. Of these, only one, known as the Weitzman Specimen, is privately held. Since the coin was never publically released, owning a 1933 double eagle is unlawful, except for the Weitzman Specimen.

Two of the preserved coins are housed in the U.S. National Numismatic Collection, ten reside in the United States Bullion Depository at Fort Knox, and the remaining, previously mentioned coin, was sold in 2002 to private collector Stuart Weitzman (then anonymous) for US$7.59 million (equivalent to $12.2 million as of 2022). This was the second highest auction price ever fetched by a single U.S. coin. In June 2021, the same coin was auctioned again to an undisclosed buyer for a record-breaking US$18.8 million, making it the priciest coin ever sold.

The 1933 Double Eagle is one of the most famous and valuable coins in the world. It is a symbol of the Great Depression and the history of American coinage.

Mint year:1933
Original value: $20
Current value: $18.9 million

1794 Flowing Hair Dollar

The Flowing Hair dollar has the distinction of being the first dollar coin issued by the U.S. federal government. This coin, minted in 1794 and 1795, had its size and weight patterned after the Spanish dollar, a coin widely used in trade across the Americas.

The story of the Flowing Hair dollar starts in 1791, when a study by Alexander Hamilton prompted Congress to pass a joint resolution for the creation of a national mint. In the same year, President George Washington, in his third State of the Union address, advocated for a mint which was officially sanctioned by the Coinage Act of 1792. However, silver and gold coins weren’t minted until 1794. The Flowing Hair dollar, a design of Robert Scot, was first minted in 1794, and once again in 1795. By October 1795, the Flowing Hair dollar was replaced by the Draped Bust dollar design.

Only 1,758 1794 Flowing Hair Dollars were minted, and they are now some of the most valuable coins in the world. In 2013, the finest known example of the 1794 Flowing Hair Dollar was sold at auction for $10,016,875, setting a record for the highest price ever paid for a coin. 

Mint year:1794
Original value: $1
Current value: $12 million

1787 Brasher Doubloon

In 1787, Ephraim Brasher, a skilled goldsmith and silversmith, proposed a petition to the State of New York for minting copper coins. However, the state declined his proposal, choosing not to venture into copper coinage. Brasher was a well-respected craftsman, and his hallmark was well-esteemed across the United States. He marked not only his own coins but also other coins sent to him for assay proofing. Over the following years, Brasher minted several copper coins and a small number of gold coins.

The value of this coin, denominated as eight Spanish escudos or sixteen Spanish dollars ($16), underwent initial terminology confusion. It was initially dubbed the “double doubloon” before becoming known as the “Spanish doubloon.” To clarify, the $4 coin became commonly known as the doubloon, while the $16 coin was referred to as the doubloon of eight (escudos), a practice also adopted in Spanish America.

A surviving gold coin, weighing 26.6 grams and composed of 0.917 (22-carat) gold, was auctioned for $625,000 in March 1981.

On January 12, 2005, Heritage Auction Galleries auctioned all three varieties of Brasher Doubloons during their Florida United Numismatists U.S. Coin Auction, Platinum Night Session. The coins fetched $2,415,000 for the New York Style EB Punch on Wing NGC AU55, $2,990,000 for the unique New York Style EB Punch on Breast NGC XF45, and $690,000 for the less renowned but rare Lima Style Doubloon. In December 2011, the unique Brasher Doubloon, the first U.S. gold coin, was sold by rare-coin dealer Steven L. Contursi of Laguna Beach, California, to the Certified Acceptance Corporation (CAC) of Far Hills, New Jersey.

A Wall Street investment firm, wishing to remain anonymous, purchased it from Blanchard and Company of New Orleans, Louisiana, for almost $7.4 million, setting a record for a U.S.-minted coin. This record was surpassed in January 2021, when a Brasher Doubloon was sold by Heritage Auctions for $9.36 million, marking a new world record for a gold coin in a public auction.

Mint year: 1787
Original value: $20
Current value: $10-12 Million

1861 Paquet Liberty Head double eagle

In 1860, Anthony C. Paquet, the assistant engraver at the mint, crafted a new reverse design for the double eagle coin. It was distinguished by its tall lettering and extremely thin rim. However, in the early part of 1861, concerns were raised about the design’s durability due to the rim’s slimness. As a result, a telegraph was dispatched to the San Francisco mint instructing them to revert to the old Longacre reverse style. However, the message seemed to have taken a significant amount of time to arrive. By the time the message was received, the mint had already struck and released into circulation double eagles valued at $385,000 with the new 1861-S reverse design.

The 1861-S Paquet reverse double eagle was largely overlooked until its “rediscovery” in the 1930s. Several were found in European repositories of U.S. gold coins, and many were subsequently returned to the American coin market. Today, while rare, this coin is highly valued as a key issue within the Type One series, collected alongside the standard 1861-S double eagle. Clearly intended for circulation, this variety is undeniably a regular issue.

Mint year: 1861
Original value: $20
Current value: $7.2 million

1913 Liberty Head Nickel

The 1913 Liberty Head Nickel is one of the most famous and valuable coins in the world. It is a rare five-cent piece which was produced in extremely limited quantities unauthorized by the United States Mint, making it one of the best-known and most coveted rarities in American numismatics.

Only five 1913 Liberty Head Nickels are known to exist, and they are all in private hands. The coins were produced by a mint worker named William Johnson, who made them using dies from the 1912 Liberty Head Nickel design.

In 1972, one specimen of the five cent coin became the first coin to sell for over US$100,000; in 1996, another specimen became the first to sell for over US$1 million. A specimen was sold for US$3 million in a 2004 private sale, then resold for US$3.7 million at a public auction in 2010.

Mint year: 1913
Original value: $0.05
Current value: $5 million

1804 Dollar

1804 dollar

The 1804 dollar, also known as the Bowed Liberty Dollar, is a coin of great significance produced by the United States Mint. Despite its 1804 date, all known specimens were minted during the 1830s or later. A total of fifteen authentic coins are currently known to exist. These special dollar coins were first manufactured as a part of proof coin sets intended as diplomatic gifts during Edmund Roberts’ visits to Siam and Muscat.

Roberts distributed these coins in 1834 and 1835. However, his death in Macau prevented him from delivering two additional sets intended for government representatives in Japan and Cochinchina. Apart from the 1804 dollars made for the diplomatic gifts, the Mint also produced a few for exchanges with collectors to acquire desirable pieces for the Mint’s coin collection. In 1842, numismatists became aware of the existence of the 1804 dollar when an illustration appeared in a publication authored by two Mint employees.

A year later, a collector managed to obtain one specimen from the Mint. Owing to the increasing demand from numismatists, Mint officials clandestinely produced a few more examples. These later strikes, however, were missing the correct edge lettering. Subsequent mintings included the correct lettering. Coins produced for the diplomatic mission, those surreptitiously struck without edge lettering, and those with the lettering are collectively known as “Class I”, “Class II”, and “Class III” dollars.

Since their discovery, 1804 dollars have consistently fetched high prices. By 1885, auction prices reached $1,000 and exceeded $30,000 by the mid-twentieth century. In 1999, a record was set when a Class I example sold for $4.14 million, marking the highest price ever paid for a coin at the time. Due to their high value, the 1804 dollars have often been the target of counterfeit attempts and other fraudulent practices.

Mint year: 1804
Original value: $1
Current value: $2-3 million

1792 Spanish Milled Dollar

1792 Spanish Milled Dollar

The first coin minted by the United States Mint, and it helped to establish the value of the US dollar. Only a handful of coins are known to exist, and they are worth millions of dollars each.

Mint year: 1792
Original value: $1
Current value: $1-2 million

1822 Half Eagle

1822 Half Eagle

The 1822 Half Eagle holds a legendary status as the most sought-after and esteemed U.S. gold coin. When other notable rarities were selling for relatively modest sums, this coin exchanged hands at extraordinary prices. Only three specimens of this coin are known to exist: two are safeguarded in the Smithsonian Institution (one in the Mint Collection and the other in the Lilly Collection), while the third one is part of the Louis Eliasberg Collection.

The specimen in the Mint Collection has been part of its holdings since the 1830s. The Lilly specimen, acquired from Amon Carter Jr. in the early 1960s, is the renowned H. P. Smith-William Dunham specimen. It was first sold at the 1890 Parmelee Sale for $900, then fetched $2165 at the H.P. Smith Collection Sale in 1906, and finally broke records when it sold for $11,575 at the Dunham Sale.

The Eliasberg coin, the finest among the three specimens, was acquired by Mr. Eliasberg from Abe Kosoff in July 1945 for $14,000. All three specimens are in the Very Fine to Extremely Fine condition range, further enhancing their rarity and value.

Mint year: 1822
Original value: $5
Current value: $840,000

1853-O Seated Liberty Half Dime

1853-O Seated Liberty Half Dime

Mint year: 1853
Original value: $0.50
Current value: $500,000

1894-S Barber Quarter

1894-S Barber Quarter

Mint year: 1894
Original value: $0.25
Current value: $300,000

The Barber Quarter, minted in locations like Philadelphia, New Orleans, and San Francisco, offers three 1894 varieties. The 1894-S from San Francisco is the rarest, constituting under 30% of all Barber Quarters made that year. Although a coveted collectible, many existing Barber Quarters show clear signs of age, challenging collectors seeking pristine pieces.

1937-S Washington Quarter with Doubled Die Obverse

1937-S Washington Quarter with Doubled Die Obverse

This coin is one of the most valuable Washington quarters, due to a die error that caused the obverse to be doubled.

Mint year: 1937
Original value: $0.25
Current value: $250,000

1909-S VDB Lincoln Cent

1909-S VDB Lincoln Cent

The 1909-S VDB Lincoln Cent, a key variety of the U.S. one-cent coin, is recognized for its low mintage. This coin was struck by the United States Mint in San Francisco in 1909 and replaced the Indian Head penny as the first U.S. everyday coin to depict a real person. However, it sparked immediate controversy due to the engraving of the initials of Victor David Brenner, the coin’s sculptor, on the reverse side.

To commemorate Abraham Lincoln as the preserver of the Union, U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt commissioned a new design featuring Lincoln’s profile. The coins were originally set to be released on Lincoln’s 100th birth anniversary, February 12, 1909. However, the release was delayed to incorporate the phrase “In God We Trust,” and the coin was finally issued on August 2, 1909.

Just days after the coin’s release, production was halted on August 6, 1909, to eliminate Brenner’s initials (VDB) from the coin dies. The Philadelphia Mint (with no mint mark) and the San Francisco Mint (bearing the mint mark ‘S’) were responsible for minting the Lincoln cent. While the Philadelphia Mint produced 27,995,000 VDB pennies, the San Francisco Mint only minted 484,000, making this particular variant the scarcest in the series.

News of the coin’s discontinuation prompted Americans to form long queues to acquire these pennies, anticipating their potential value as collectibles. In cities across the U.S., people sought large quantities of pennies for resale. The frenzy was so intense in New York City that police had to be deployed to manage the crowds.

Mint year: 1909
Original value: $0.01
Current value: $200,000

1909-S VDB Lincoln Cent, without the “VDB” initials

This coin is one of the most valuable Lincoln cents, due to a die error that caused the “VDB” initials to be omitted from the obverse.

Mint year: 1909
Original value: $0.01
Current value: $100,000

1856 Flying Eagle Cent

1856 Flying Eagle Cent

The Flying Eagle cent, a one-cent coin minted by the United States Mint, was first struck as a pattern coin in 1856 and later circulated in 1857 and 1858. James B. Longacre, the Mint’s Chief Engraver, designed the coin, modeling the flying eagle on the work of his predecessor, Christian Gobrecht.

By the early 1850s, the large cent (roughly the size of a half dollar) that the Mint was producing had become both commercially undesirable and costly to manufacture. After testing various sizes and materials, the Mint settled on a new, smaller cent made of an alloy comprising 88% copper and 12% nickel. After creating patterns with an 1856 date and presenting them to lawmakers and officials, Congress officially approved the new coin in February 1857.

The new cent was circulated as a replacement for the worn-out Spanish colonial silver coin that had previously been in circulation in the U.S., as well as its larger predecessor. However, the Mint produced so many of these cents that they clogged commercial channels, especially since they were not legal tender and no one was obligated to accept them. The eagle design did not imprint well and was eventually substituted in 1859 by Longacre’s Indian Head cent design.

Mint year: 1856
Original value: $0.01
Current value: $100,000

1857 Flying Eagle Cent

1857 Flying Eagle Cent

The first small-sized US cent, this coin is one of the most popular among collectors.

Mint year: 1857
Original value: $0.01
Current value: $100,000

1914-D Lincoln Cent

1914-D Lincoln Cent

The 1914-D Lincoln Cent holds a prestigious position among the Lincoln Cent series due to its status as a key date. With a relatively low mintage of approximately 1.2 million, it is considered a rare find. This rarity becomes even more pronounced when contrasted with the over 75 million Lincoln Cents minted in Philadelphia in the same year. However, its scarcity and the consequent high market value have led to an unfortunate prevalence of counterfeits. As a result, it is strongly advised to seek authentication when acquiring a 1914-D Lincoln Cent.

Mint year: 1914
Original value: $0.01
Current value: $100,000

1916 D Lincoln Cent with Doubled Die Obverse

1916 D Lincoln Cent with Doubled Die Obverse

This coin is one of the most valuable Lincoln cents, due to a die error that caused the obverse to be doubled.

Mint year: 1916
Original value: $0.01
Current value: $100,000

1950-D Jefferson Nickel with Doubled Die Obverse

This coin is one of the most valuable Jefferson nickels, due to a die error that caused the obverse to be doubled.

Mint year: 1950
Original value: $0.05
Current value: $100,000

1955 Doubled Die Lincoln Cent

1955 Doubled Die Lincoln Cent

The 1955 doubled die cent signifies a unique variant originating during the production of the one cent coin at the U.S. Mint in 1955.

The formation of a modern coin die involves the application of multiple strikes from a working hub to imprint the incuse image that will eventually be used to mint coins. In an unexpected turn of events in 1955, a working obverse die at the Philadelphia Mint got misaligned during its second strike from the working hub, leading to a duplicated image.

This double-striking phenomenon primarily affected the date and inscriptions, with minor doubling and a noticeable detail loss observed on Lincoln’s bust. All coins minted from this particular die displayed these doubled features. Approximately 40,000 of these coins were minted, all during a single night shift at the Philadelphia Mint. Around 20,000 to 24,000 of these pennies ended up in circulation post the minting error.

The 1955 doubled die is considered one of the most renowned die variants in U.S. coinage. It is a rarity to find one in flawless mint condition, as the majority were discovered while already in circulation. Over time, numerous counterfeits of this coin have been unearthed. Collectors are recommended to solicit expert opinion before purchasing such coins, especially if they aren’t certified by reputable numismatic certification companies.

A variant that often gets mistaken for the 1955 doubled die is the “Poor Man’s Doubled Die” cent, which is a product of die deterioration doubling. The distortion and erosion of the design on a worn die results in parts of the design, such as the last digit of the date, appearing doubled. Being more common than the actual doubled die, this variant typically sells for just a few dollars.

Mint year: 1955
Original value: $0.01
Current value: $50,000

1922 Peace Dollar with Overdate

This coin is one of the most valuable Peace dollars, due to a die error that caused the date to be overstruck.

Mint year: 1922
Original value: $1
Current value: $50,000

1943 Lincoln Cent struck on a copper-nickel planchet

This coin is one of the most valuable Lincoln cents, due to a minting error that caused it to be struck on a copper-nickel planchet instead of a steel planchet.

Mint year: 1943
Original value: $0.01
Current value: $35,000

1943 Lincoln Cent struck on a Cuban centavo planchet

Similar to the above, this coin is valuable due to a minting error that caused it to be struck on a Cuban centavo planchet instead of a steel planchet.

Mint year: 1943
Original value: $0.01
Current value: $35,000

Foreign Coins Worth Money

Turns out, other countries have currencies too! Let’s check out some of the most valuable foreign coins from other parts of the world:

Mexican Coins Worth Money

1823 8 Reales “Reina Victoria”

Mint year: 1823
Original value: $8
Current value: $1 million

1732 8 Reales “Pillar”

1732 8 Reales “Pillar”

This coin is one of the most valuable Mexican coins, due to its high-grade condition and historical significance.

Mint year: 1732
Original value: $8
Current value: $750,000

1811 8 Reales “Zitacuaro”

1811 8 Reales “Zitacuaro”

This coin is one of the most valuable Mexican coins, due to its historical significance as one of the first coins minted after Mexico’s independence.

Mint year: 1811
Original value: $8
Current value: $600,000

1822 8 Escudos

1822 8 Escudos

Mint year: 1822
Original value: $16
Current value: $500,000

1910 20 Pesos “Moctezuma”

Mint year: 1910
Original value: $20
Current value: $400,000

Canadian Coins Worth Money

1936 Canadian “Dot” Penny

This coin is one of the rarest Canadian coins, due to a minting error that caused a small dot to appear on the obverse.

Mint year: 1936
Original value: $0.01
Current value: $400,000

1925 Small 1-Cent

Mint year: 1923
Original value: $0.01
Current value: $3,374

1955 No Shoulder Fold (NSF) Penny

1955 No Shoulder Fold (NSF) Penny

Mint year: 1955
Original value: $$0.01
Current value: $5,500

1923 Small 1-Cent

1923 Small 1-Cent

Mint year: 1923
Original value: $0.01
Current value: $2,700

1953 Shoulder Fold (SF) Penny

This coin is one of the rarest Canadian pennies, due to a minting error that caused a small fold to appear on the shoulder of the obverse.

Mint year: 1953
Original value: $0.01
Current value: $2,000

Chinese Coins Worth Money

1903 Fengtien Tael

The 1903 Fengtien Tael is a silver coin that was minted in Fengtian, China (now Shenyang, Liaoning Province). It is one of the rarest and most valuable coins in the world, and only one example is known to exist. 

The coin was minted in 1903, during a period of political and economic turmoil in China. It features a portrait of the Qing Emperor Guangxu on the obverse and a dragon on the reverse. The coin is made of .990 fine silver and weighs 37.3 grams.

The 1903 Fengtien Tael was originally owned by Eduard Kann, a renowned numismatist. It was sold at auction in 2022 for over $6.9 million, setting a record for the highest price ever paid for a Chinese coin.

Mint year: 1903
Original value: $20
Current value: $6.9 million

1897 Kuang-Hsu Proof Dollar

1897 Kuang-Hsu Proof Dollar

This coin is one of the most valuable Chinese coins, due to its high-grade condition and beautiful design.

Mint year: 1897
Original value: $1
Current value: $240,000

1853 $1 “Cash”

Mint year: 1853
Original value: $1
Current value: $100,000

1914 Yuan Shi Kai One Dollar Silver, Hat Touching Brim

1914 Yuan Shi Kai One Dollar Silver, Hat Touching Brim

Mint year: 1914
Original value: $1
Current value: $50,000

1916 Yuan Shi Kai One Dollar Silver, Flying Dragon

1916 Yuan Shi Kai One Dollar Silver, Flying Dragon

Mint year: 1916
Original value: $1
Current value: $50,000

British Coins Worth Money

1797 Gold Guinea

1797 Gold Guinea

First British coin to be minted in gold.

Mint year: 1797
Original value: $1
Current value: $2.5 million

1820 Maundy Penny

1820 Maundy Penny

Minted annually by the Royal Mint and distributed by the British monarch to deserving citizens on Maundy Thursday.

Mint year: 1820
Original value: £0.01
Current value: $100,000

1933 George V Penny

1933 George V Penny

Only penny minted in 1933.

Mint year: 1933
Original value: £0.01
Current value: $50,000

1970 Victoria Sixpence

1970 Victoria Sixpence - ebay

Last sixpence minted in the United Kingdom.

Mint year: 1970
Original value: £0.06
Current value: $10,000

Other Foreign Coins Worth Money

Umayyad Gold Dinar (Umayyad Caliphate)

The Umayyad Gold Dinar was the first gold coin issued by the Umayyad Caliphate. It was introduced in 77 AH (696/697 AD) by the caliph Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan. The coin is made of pure gold and weighs 4.25 grams. It has a diameter of 21 mm and a thickness of 2 mm. 

The obverse of the coin features the Arabic inscription “Muhammad is the messenger of God, who sent him with guidance and the religion of truth that he might make it supreme over all religions.” The reverse of the coin features the Arabic inscription “In the name of God, this dinar was struck in the year seven and seventy.”

The Umayyad Gold Dinar was widely circulated throughout the Islamic world. It was used as a unit of currency and as a symbol of the Umayyad Caliphate. The coin is still highly prized by collectors today.

Mint year: 696 CE
Original value: £4
Current value: $5 million 

Don’t have any of these? Your Coins Still Might be Worth Something!

Let’s face it. You’re pretty unlikely to find any of these coins in your possession. But that doesn’t mean what you DO have in your hands isn’t worth anything. In fact, many old coins can fetch some pretty high prices if they’re in good condition, making sifting through your collection definitely worthwhile.

And the best news is that you don’t need to work out the value yourself. My scrap silver calculator will help you identify exactly how much you’re likely to get from selling your coins – and, what’s more, I’ll be releasing a calculator dedicated to coins over the next few weeks.

Stay tuned!

Where to Buy Rare Coins

OK, so some of these – especially those coins worth millions – might be really rare, but fortunately for us, there are plenty of ways to buy the coins that are still out there and up for grabs

My first port of call is Apmex. For the size of its catalog and assurances of quality, there’s really no better place. 

Next, I always check out what the auctioneers at Whatnot have to sell – I’ve found that there are tons of good deals to be had. You can get $15 of Whatnot credit with my link. What are you waiting for?

Heritage Auctions is a great option as well, as are the good old-fashioned estate sales and coin shows in your city. 

The Bottom Line

Hopefully, this list of coins worth money has given you a good idea of what a rare coin can really mean. If you’re a seasoned numismatist, these numbers aren’t new. If you’re a beginner, get excited – you never know what’ll fall into your hands.

Show some love and buy your precious metals with my Apmex link!

(it's the same thing, but you get a thank you from me!)

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